OCommBIOSTEC 2017 Abstracts


Full Papers
Paper Nr: 4
Title:

How to Filter out Noises of Vital Signs Monitoring Data During Trekking?

Authors:

Takeo Shibata

Abstract: Some healthy volunteers were monitored their vital signs (heart rate, heartbeat interval, body surface temperature, and stress: LF HF ratio) and environmental factors (ambient temperature, humidity, illuminance, and atmospheric pressure) during trekking mount Oyama in Japan. Monitored data were sent to a cloud server through a smart phone immediately. This study aims to evaluate if environmental stress and exercise stress influence vital signs and autonomic nerve stress. However corrected vital signs include much noises and errors. We will introduce this study and show some data. We want expertises to filter out noises of vital sign monitoring data.

Paper Nr: 5
Title:

Tumor Spheroid Formation: Means, Monitoring and Analysis of Intercellular Interaction

Authors:

Mordechai Deutsch, Maria Sobolev, Elena Afrimzon, Yishai Tauber and Naomi Zurgil

Abstract: Multicellular tumor spheroids mimic in vivo tumor biology and aspects of the tumor microenvironment (e.g. extracellular matrix). Spheroids can self-assemble, can contain more than one cell type, harbor subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSC) and express in vivo human tumor genes better than monolayer cell culture. In recent years, the 3D spheroid model has proved to be ideal for cancer drug discovery and has been adapted for use with high-throughput screening technologies. Methodologies and criteria for evaluation of anti-tumor drug activity by monitoring the effect on cell-cell interaction and consequent cell aggregation process is presented. A miniaturized imaging platform that facilitates the simultaneous creation and culturing of a large number of spheroids, as well as screening their response to antitumor drugs was used. The essential feature of the device is an array made of picoliter wells (PWs), each designed to enable single spheroid formation, culturing and monitoring at single cell resolution. Non-interfering label-free imaging was performed, and backed by a thorough theoretical simulation based investigation (by means of Monte Carlo simulation) of cell-cell interaction in the course of spheroid formation while subjected to intercellular forces, different environmental conditions and a variety of bio-manipulations. Results revealed the spatial-temporal dependence of secreted factor concentrations from cells randomly placed in space, as well as the consequent trajectories of “test cells”. Moreover, it has been shown that cells secreting chemotactic factors are not affected by the secretion of neighboring cells even though the latter secretion rate is much higher than that of the former. These findings contradict the commonly assumed simplified ‘radius of influence’ of a cell and urge us to recommend avoiding the use of cells with strong chemotaxis as models for the examination of spheroid aggregation. In addition, spheroid formation on unlimited open-surface coated with anti-cell-adhesion material, is not recommended as an ideal simulation model for the investigation of interaction based on cell-cell adhesion forces. The effect of anti-tumor drugs was demonstrated on breast cancer spheroids that were exposed to cytotoxic agents and to Nitric Oxide. Two algorithms were developed, one for identifying PWs and cells/cell aggregates within them, for analyzing aggregation rate, cell merging and for examining aggregate balling up processes. The other allows accurate measurement of spheroid volume during segmentation. The ratio between spheroid volumes before and after drug treatment is suggested as an efficient tool for evaluating success in drug treatment.

Paper Nr: 8
Title:

Live-cell Array Methodology for Culturing, Treatment and Kinetic Measurements of Individual Cells/Group of Cells, at Single Element Resolution

Authors:

Mordechai Deutsch, Maria Sobolev, Elena Afrimzon, Yishai Tauber, Naomi Zurgil, Orit Ravid-Hermesh, Sergei Moshkov and Yana Shafran

Abstract: Live-cell analysis of individual cells is a challenging endeavor due to the small volume of a single cell, cell motility and the complexity of cellular systems. Novel methodologies and means for analyzing dynamic states of individual cells/cell groups which enable monitoring alteration in cell behavior and function over time in a complex tissue environment, and assessing functional changes at single-element level are presented. The platforms are based on various types of arrays made of high-quality transparent miniature femtoliter-, picoliter- and nanoliter-volume vessels, for investigating living cells at molecular, cellular and multicellular levels, respectively. Each pico/nano-liter chamber is designed to hold a single cell or cell-aggregate without tethering. The technology is extremely flexible, enabling use of a spectrum of biomaterials and control over dimension, shape, configuration and distribution of the microstructures, and thus, facilitating adaptation of the arrays to various cell types and use of both label-free and fluorescence detection methods to determine live-cell status in real time. Practical applications of the platforms include: generation and drug screening of 3D multicellular cancer spheroids, multiplexed analysis of cancer stem cells and tumor heterogeneity, measurement of biochemical processes in live cells, followed by cell content analysis of the same cells, cryopreservation of individual cells, single cell analysis of cell transfection and protein translocation. The methodology, together with quantitative image analysis at single-element resolution, may be applicable in personalized cancer treatment, including multiplex ex-vivo analysis of heterogeneous patient-derived specimens, and for detection and evaluation of drug sensitivity of specific cell phenotypes.

Paper Nr: 9
Title:

Implementation and Integration of Telemedicine Services in the Developing World - Organisational Readiness Assessment in Uganda

Authors:

Vincent Kiberu

Abstract: This study assessed organisational readiness to implement and integrate telemedicine services at three levels of the healthcare system. After validation a questionnaire was distributed for self-administration to senior administrators and Physicians at National Referral Hospital (NRH), Regional Referral Hospital (RRH), and Health Centre level four (HC-IV) s in Uganda. Of the respondents, 24/114 (21%) were from HC-IVs, 44/114 (39%) were from RRHs, and 46/114 (40%) from NRH. Physicians made up 45.8% (11) of respondents at HC-IVs, 59% (26) at RRHs, 30.4% (14) at NRH while the rest were senior administrators. Physicians across all health facilities were 39% (crude OR=1.39 [95% CI =0.38 – 4.95]) more likely to integrate telemedicine into the healthcare system relative to administrators. A significant association existed between the state of readiness and type of health facility p<0.001. Among the factors investigated only the level of health facility was found to have a significant statistical association with being ready to integrate telemedicine. Organisational readiness to implement and integrate telemedicine services varies at the different levels of the healthcare system. The factors associated with integration of telemedicine services that were investigated didn’t show significant association with the state of readiness hence a need exists to understand other factors affecting integration.

Posters
Paper Nr: 1
Title:

Development of Cell Counting System for Complete Blood cell Count (CBC) using Light Scattering

Authors:

Jae Sung Park, Ji Hyeong Ryu, Ho Lee and Tae Ho Jun

Abstract: Complete Blood cell Count (CBC) is the most basic method in modern diagnostic medicine and is used to ascertain the quantification of erythrocytes, platelets, and leukocytes in the blood. One method of CBC can be encompassed in the critical technology of flow cytometry by the use of laser scattering and the detection of electrical DC resistance. After one or more visible wavelengths of laser irradiance is focused into at least one micro-channel of a blood flow sample, the constituents can be quantified, categorized, and sized via the detection of scattered light and fluorescence. Forward scattered light acquires information about blood cell size while side scattered light obtains characteristics of cellular structures such as micro-organi, nucleic acid, plasma membranes, and granules. In addition, fluorescence propagating in the side scattered direction, but detected independently with the use of a beam splitter, can be employed to acquire information about specific cells. By integrating the information of these channels, we can determine the number and kind of blood cells in a sample. Accurate determination of these parameters is popular in studies conducted in conjugation with hemo-diagnostic medicine which seek the detection of differentiation in leukocytes and other specific cells for the purpose of diagnosis of various diseases. As such, we proposed to study and build an advanced flow cytometry system of a design, in order to secure this foundation technology. In initial tests, we detected the scattered light signal from a stationary sample using two photo-sensors. For confirmation of whether these signals were from light scattered by blood cells or not, we proposed a system which imaged the reflected light with a CCD while recording the scattered light from the sample. Thus, we confirmed the signals were meaningful and we are now in the process of conducting follow-up studies and implementing further developments in our own system